Special Education ‘Issues & Applications Journal’ Entry 3

Questions for Entry 3

1. Choose one of the high-incidence or low-incidence disabilities discussed in Chapter 5 & Chapter 6, and describe what a special educator needs to consider when teaching students with this disability.

2. In what ways can Mrs. Santiago and Ms. Benz differentiate instruction for all of their students who require academic assistance.

Resource:

https://bookshelf.vitalsource.com/books/9781544365008/epubcfi/6/36%5B;vnd.vst.idref=s9781506394664.i2277%5D!/4/2%5Bs9781506394664.i2277%5D/2/[email protected]:0

All premium videos reside in the Interactive eBook. To access the videos for chapter 7, 

click here
Links to an external site.

 or go to the Media Library at the beginning of the chapter. For a detailed list of premium videos for chapter 7, click into this folder. 

 Video Cases:  SAGE Premium Video tools and resources boost comprehension and bolster analysis.

Video Cases

SAGE Premium Video tools and resources boost comprehension and bolster analysis. 

7.1: Planning and Teaching a Bilingual Lesson (available on page 190 of the Interactive eBook)

7.2: Promoting Meaningful Learning (available on page 193 of the Interactive eBook)

7.3: Math Instruction (available on page 193 of the Interactive eBook)

7.4: Supporting ELL in the Classroom (available on page 201 of the Interactive eBook)

7.5: Flexible Small Groups (available on page 205 of the Interactive eBook)

7.6: One-on-one Instruction (available on page 205 of the Interactive eBook)

Article 1: 
Scott, B. J., Vitale, M. R., & Masten, W. G. (1998). Implementing instructional adaptations for students with disabilities in inclusive classrooms: A literature review. 
Remedial and Special Education, 19(2), 106–119. http://doi.org/10.1177/074193259801900205
Links to an external site.

Abstract: Examined are classroom teachers’ perceptions and use of instructional adaptations in general education classes. General educators were found to be positive about the desirability/effectiveness and reasonability/feasibility of making instructional adaptations for students with disabilities. However, research also revealed that when these students are included in general education classrooms, their teachers are unlikely to alter their traditional whole-group instructional strategies in favor of specific individualized adaptations. In interpreting this inconsistency, we found that the literature identified lack of teacher training and limited school support as barriers to classroom teachers’ being able to accommodate the individual needs of students in inclusive settings. Implications for practice and for future research are discussed.

Article 2: 
Vaughn, S., Hughes, M. T., Moody, S. W., & Elbaum, B. (2001). Instructional grouping for reading for students with LD: Implications for practice. 
Intervention in School and Clinic, 36(3), 131–137. http://doi.org/10.1177/105345120103600301
Links to an external site.

Abstract: Teachers’ grouping practices during reading instruction can serve as a critical component in facilitating effective implementation of reading instruction and inclusion of students with disabilities in general education classes. In this article, we provide an overview of the recent research on grouping practices (whole class, small group, pairs, one-on-one) during reading instruction for students with disabilities. After discussion of each grouping format, implications for practice are highlighted with particular emphasis on instructional practices that promote effective grouping to meet the needs of all students during reading in general education classrooms.

https://touro.instructure.com/courses/87459/pages/module-7-open-access-multimedia-resources?module_item_id=2627797#:~:text=Universal%20Design%20for,for%20each%20step.


Quality of Content

3 pts

Advanced

Candidate’s response is thorough, addressing all points raised in the guiding question

2 pts

Proficient

Candidate’s response is relevant, addressing most points raised in the guiding questions

1 pts

Novice

Candidate’s response is somewhat relevant, addressing some points raised in the guiding questions

3 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeQuality of Argument

3 pts

Advanced

All of the arguments in the candidate’s response are presented in clear and comprehensible fashion

2 pts

Proficient

Most of the arguments in the candidate’s response are presented in clear and comprehensible fashion

1 pts

Novice

Some of the arguments in the candidate’s response are presented in clear and comprehensible fashion

3 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeLength of Response

3 pts

Advanced

Length of response to each question is 200-250 words

2 pts

Proficient

Length of response to each question is 150-200 words

1 pts

Novice

Length of response to each question is 100-150 words

3 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeTimeliness

1 pts

Proficient

Response is submitted by the due date and time