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Annotated Bibliography

Student’s name

Institution affiliation

Date


Griffin, T. (2021). Comparing expert versus general public rationale for death penalty support and opposition: Is expert perspective on capital punishment consistent with “disciplined retention”?. Punishment & Society, 23(4), 557-577. 
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/14624745211029370  

This article explores the reasons why the public’s support or opposition to the death sentence varies from that of professionals. Griffin examines polls of the two groups and finds that professionals are more inclined to favor the death sentence if they think it is a successful deterrent to crime. On the other hand, when people believe that the death penalty is a fair punishment for certain offenses, they are more inclined to favor it. Griffin comes to the conclusion that the two sides have different justifications for favoring or opposing the death sentence, and that this distinction could help to explain why this punishment is so divisive. This article is relevant to my research because it sheds light on why experts and the general public may disagree on the death penalty. It also provides insight into bridging the gap between the two groups.

Wu, S. (2021). The Effect of Wrongful Conviction Rate on Death Penalty Support and How It Closes the Racial Gap. American Journal of Criminal Justice, 1-19. 
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12103-021-09637-6

This article discusses how the wrongful conviction rate affects support for the death penalty and how it can close the racial gap. Using data from the National Registry of Exonerations, the author investigates the link between the frequency of false convictions and popular support for the death sentence. The author finds that as the frequency of false convictions rises, so does popular support for the death sentence. The author suggests that the relationship between wrongful convictions and public support for the death sentence may aid in reducing racial disparities in this attitude. This article is important to my study because it investigates how erroneous convictions affect public support for the death sentence. The study is well-written, and the author’s conclusions are backed up by information from the National Registry of Exonerations.

References

Griffin, T. (2021). Comparing expert versus general public rationale for death penalty support and opposition: Is expert perspective on capital punishment consistent with “disciplined retention”?. Punishment & Society, 23(4), 557-577. 
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/14624745211029370  

Wu, S. (2021). The Effect of Wrongful Conviction Rate on Death Penalty Support and How It Closes the Racial Gap. American Journal of Criminal Justice, 1-19. 
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12103-021-09637-6