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Coordination of care amongst nurses, pharmacists, doctors, and other disciplines has grown more crucial as healthcare delivery changes to become more integrated. Partnership working is, in its most basic sense, the act of addressing care delivery from a team-based viewpoint. Group practices, independent practice associations, and medical practice management firms have historically been the main venues for physician partnership. Research on the relative advantages of physician teamwork has produced findings that are comparable to those for hospitals. Some of the benefits include chances for clinical treatment and management improvements and more negotiation clout with health insurers (Kaiser, 2019).

Studies also point out certain particular advantages for physician groups: in contrast to the alternative of tiny, autonomous practices, doctor mergers and alliances can improve their access to funding and managerial know-how. The greatest patient-centered, effective healthcare initiatives to date have come from institutions that set an example of interdisciplinary partnership from the bedside to the executive. Nurses should begin by accepting their role as a member of the patient’s team if they want to incorporate or enhance inter-professionalism in their profession. Attempting to communicate with the other groups engaged in the patient’s care when providing care is advisable. Each health discipline has its philosophies, knowledge bases, and subcultures. The voices of some members are given precedence over those of others when power structures are added. Physician cooperation equalizes the playing field and recognizes that each member of the care team contributes significantly. The maintenance and recruitment of employees can both benefit from that sense of belonging and friendship.

However, there are some disadvantages associated with collaboration with these physician organizations pursuing FPA. Due to structurally imposed hierarchies within professions, there is an imbalance of power amongst specialists at the inter-individual level, particularly between physicians and other professions. The undervaluation of the contributions and abilities of other specialists as well as the absence of a shared vision and objectives are related to the lack of clarity regarding the roles and responsibilities of other specialists and the fear of losing one’s borders in newly defined responsibilities (Rawlinson et al., 2021). This may come across as an intrusion on other people’s expertise and a restriction on their right to privacy. Another drawback that interferes with collaboration in this field is accountability. Professionals specify the norms they intend to uphold in their work and are responsible to their peers for doing so. Through collaboration, performance appraisal by team members with different professions is introduced.

 

 

  References

Kaiser, S. (2019). Collaboration and service quality among health care professionals working with children and their families in Norwegian municipalities.

Rawlinson, C., Carron, T., Cohidon, C., Arditi, C., Hong, Q. N., Pluye, P., Peytremann-Bridevaux, I., & Gilles, I. (2021). An Overview of Reviews on Interprofessional Collaboration in Primary Care: Barriers and Facilitators. International journal of integrated care21(2), 32.