You are required to write a three to five (3-5) page proposal in which you recommend the need for security awareness training. In your proposal, be sure to:

  1. Identify compliance or audit standards that your organization must adhere to.
  2. Identify security awareness requirements for those standards.
  3. Identify training methods to meet those requirements (In house, contract or CBT).

Assumptions

  • You should assume that your company will have to accept credit cards as payments.
  • You should assume that no current awareness/training plans exist for your company.
  • You should assume that all offices and groups need training.

Notes on submission:

  • Use at least three (3) quality resources as references in this assignment. Wikipedia and similar Websites do not qualify as quality resources.
  • Your assignment must follow these formatting requirements: Be typed, double spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12), with one-inch margins on all sides; citations and references must follow APA or school-specific format. Check with your professor for any additional instructions.
  • Include a cover page containing the title of the assignment, the student’s name, the professor’s name, the course title, and the date. The cover page and the reference page are not included in the required assignment page length.

Security Awareness Compliance
Requirements

Updated: 11 October, 2017

SANS MGT433 – https://securingthehuman.sans.org

Executive Summary
The purpose of this document is to identify different standards and regulations that require
security awareness programs.

ISO/IEC 27001 and 27002
8.2.2: All employees of the organization and, where relevant, contractors and third-party
users should receive appropriate awareness training and regular updates in organizational
policies and procedures, as relevant for their job function.

Learn more at: http://www.iso.org/iso/home/standards/management-
standards/iso27001.htm

PCI DSS
12.6: Make all employees aware of the importance of cardholder information security.

• Educate employees (for example, through posters, letters, memos, meetings, and
promotions).

• Require employees to acknowledge in writing that they have read and understand the
company’s security policy and procedures.

Download the PCI DSS standard at: https://www.pcisecuritystandards.org/document_library

Download the PCI DSS Security Awareness Program Guidelines at:
https://www.pcisecuritystandards.org/documents/PCI_DSS_V1.0_Best_Practices_for_Imple
menting_Security_Awareness_Program.pdf

SANS MGT433 – https://securingthehuman.sans.org

Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA)
§3544.(b).(4).(A),(B): Securing awareness training to inform personnel, including
contractors and other users of information systems that support the operations and assets
of the agency, of information security risks associated with their activities and their
responsibilities in complying with agency policies and procedures designed to reduce these
risks.

Learn more at: http://www.dhs.gov/fisma

Gramm-Leach Bliley Act
The Safeguards Rule requires companies to assess and address the risks to customer
information in all areas of their operation, including three areas that are particularly
important to information security: Employee Management and Training; Information
Systems; and Detecting and Managing System Failures. Depending on the nature of their
business operations, firms should consider implementing the following practices: Employee
Management and Training. The success of your information security plan depends largely on
the employees who implement it.

GLBA Overview: https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/privacy-and-
security/gramm-leach-bliley-act

Safeguards Rule: https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/guidance/financial-
institutions-customer-information-complying

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
§164.308.(a).(5).(i): Implement a security awareness and training program for all members
of its workforce (including management).

Learn more at: http://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/index.html

SANS MGT433 – https://securingthehuman.sans.org

Red Flags Rule
§16 CFR 681.1(d)-(e): Employees should be trained about the various red flags to look for
and any other relevant aspect of the organization’s Identity Theft Prevention Program.

Learn more at: https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/privacy-and-security/red-
flags-rule

NERC CIP
The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Critical Infrastructure Protection
Standard. CIP-004-5.1 R1 – Each Responsible Entity shall implement one or more
documented processes that collectively include security awareness that, at least once each
calendar quarter, reinforces cyber security practices (which may include associated physical
security practices) for the Responsible Entity’s personnel who have authorized electronic or
authorized unescorted physical access to BES Cyber Systems.

Learn more at: http://www.nerc.com/pa/Stand/Pages/CIPStandards.aspx

CobiT
PO7.4 Personnel Training: Provide IT employees with appropriate orientation when hired
and ongoing training to maintain their knowledge, skills, abilities, internal controls, and
security awareness at the level required to achieve organizational goals.

§DS7: Management of the process of educate and train users that satisfies the business
requirement for IT of effectively and efficiently using applications and technology solutions
and ensuring user compliance with policies and procedures is: […] 3 Defined when a training
and education program is instituted and communicated, and employees and managers
identify and document training needs. Training and education processes are standardized
and documented. Budgets, resources, facilities, and trainers are established to support the
training and education program. Formal classes are given to employees on ethical conduct
and system security awareness and practices. Most training and education processes are
monitored, but not all deviations are likely to be detected by management. Analysis of
training and education problems is applied only occasionally,

Learn more at: https://cobitonline.isaca.org/

SANS MGT433 – https://securingthehuman.sans.org

U.S. State Privacy Laws
Many states in the United States have individual privacy laws. You can find a listing of most
of those state privacy laws at the Morrison & Foerster’s Privacy Library. Many of these
privacy laws require some type of awareness training or at a minimum that the privacy
requirements are communicated to employees in that state.

Learn more at: https://www.mofo.com/privacy-library

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)
The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is the latest data security legislation in the
European Union, it takes effect 25 May, 2018. The European Union has directed all
European member countries to develop and define laws regarding the protecting of personal
privacy of the citizens of their respective country. This regulation has specific requirements
for data breach notification (within 72 hours) and fines up to 4% of the organization’s global
revenues. Although each country’s implementation of this regulation is different and unique,
the regulation does require a security awareness program. Under Article 39:

The data protection officer shall have at least the following tasks: … (b) to monitor
compliance with this Regulation, with other Union or Member State data protection
provisions and with the policies of the controller or processor in relation to the protection of
personal data, including the assignment of responsibilities, awareness-raising and training
of staff involved in processing operations, and the related audits; …”

Learn more at: http://www.eugdpr.org

Australian Government InfoSec Manual
§0252: Information security awareness and training: Revision: 2; Updated: Nov-10;
Applicability: U, IC, R/P, C, S/HP, TS; Compliance: must

Agencies must provide ongoing information security awareness and training for personnel

on information security policies including topics such as responsibilities, consequences of

noncompliance, and potential security risks and countermeasures.

Download the manual at: http://www.asd.gov.au/infosec/ism

SANS MGT433 – https://securingthehuman.sans.org

PAS555 Cyber Security Risk: Governance and Management
PAS 555 is a UK standard that offers a framework that defines the outcome of good cyber

security practice. It extends beyond the technical aspects of cyber security risk to

encompass physical and people (behavioral) security aspects as well.

Clause 4: Commitment to a Cyber Security Culture: The organization’s top management

shall define and demonstrate how it engenders a culture of cyber security within the

organization. (Note: A cyber security culture is one in which values, attitudes, and behaviors

are the foundation of day-to-day life in the organization. It is one where being careless

about (cyber) security is not acceptable. It is recognized that it takes time to achieve a

culture change and cannot be immediate.)

Clause 7: Capability Development Strategy: The organization shall have cyber security

awareness programs, training, and development so that all individuals in the extended

enterprise have the awareness and competence to fulfill their cyber security role and

contribute to an effective cyber security culture.

Learn more at http://shop.bsigroup.com/en/ProductDetail/?pid=000000000030261972

Standard: PCI Data Security Standard (PCI DSS)

Version: 1.0

Date: October 2014

Author: Security Awareness Program Special Interest Group

PCI Security Standards Council

Information Supplement:

Best Practices for Implementing a
Security Awareness Program

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

ii

Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

Table of Contents

1 Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 1

1.1 Importance of Security Awareness ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 1

1.2 Intended Audience ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 2

1.3 Terminology ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2

2 Best Practices in Organizational Security Awareness ……………………………………………………………………. 3

2.1 Assemble the Security Awareness Team ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 3

2.2 Determine Roles for Security Awareness ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 3

2.2.1 Identify levels of responsibility …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3

2.2.2 Establish Minimum Security Awareness …………………………………………………………………………………… 4

2.2.3 Determine the content of training and applicability based on PCI DSS …………………………………………. 5

2.3 Security Awareness throughout the Organization ……………………………………………………………………………. 5

3 Security Awareness Training Content …………………………………………………………………………………………… 7

3.1 All Personnel………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8

3.2 Management ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 9

3.3 Specialized Roles ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9

3.3.1 Cashier/Accounting Staff ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 10

3.3.2 Procurement Team ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 10

3.3.3 IT Administrators and Developers ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 10

3.4 Define Metrics to Assess Awareness Training ………………………………………………………………………………. 11

4 Security Awareness Program Checklist ………………………………………………………………………………………. 12

Appendix A: Sample Mapping of PCI DSS Requirements to Different Roles, Materials and Metrics ……….. 13

Appendix B: Security Awareness Program Record ………………………………………………………………………………. 20

Acknowledgements …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 24

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

1

Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

1 Introduction

In order for an organization to comply with PCI DSS Requirement 12.6, a formal security awareness program

must be in place. There are many aspects to consider when meeting this requirement to develop or revitalize

such a program. The best practices included in this information supplement are intended to be a starting point

for organizations without a program in place, or as a minimum benchmark for those with existing programs

that require revisions to:

 Meet PCI DSS requirements;

 Address the quickly and ever-changing data security threat environment;

 Reinforce the organization’s business culture.

Establishing and maintaining information-security awareness through a security awareness program is vital to

an organization’s progress and success. A robust and properly implemented security awareness program

assists the organization with the education, monitoring, and ongoing maintenance of security awareness

within the organization.

This guidance focuses primarily on the following best practices:

 Organizational Security Awareness: A successful security awareness program within an organization

may include assembling a security awareness team, role-based security awareness, metrics,

appropriate training content, and communication of security awareness within the organization.

 Security Awareness Content: A critical aspect of training is the determination of the type of content.

Determining the different roles within an organization is the first step to developing the appropriate type

of content and will also help determine the information that should be included in the training.

 Security Awareness Training Checklist: Establishing a checklist may help an organization when

developing, monitoring, and/or maintaining a security awareness training program.

The information in this document is intended as supplemental guidance and does not supersede, replace, or

extend PCI DSS requirements. While all references made in this document are to PCI DSS version 3.0, the

general principles and practices offered here may be applied to any version of PCI DSS.

1.1 Importance of Security Awareness

One of the biggest risks to an organization’s information security is often not a weakness in the technology

control environment. Rather it is the action or inaction by employees and other personnel that can lead to

security incidents—for example, through disclosure of information that could be used in a social engineering

attack, not reporting observed unusual activity, accessing sensitive information unrelated to the user’s role

without following the proper procedures, and so on. It is therefore vital that organizations have a security

awareness program in place to ensure employees are aware of the importance of protecting sensitive

information, what they should do to handle information securely, and the risks of mishandling information.

Employees’ understanding of the organizational and personal consequences of mishandling sensitive

information is crucial to an organization’s success. Examples of potential consequences may include

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

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Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

penalties levied against the organization, reputational harm to the organization and employees, and impact to

an employee’s job. It is important to put potential organizational harm into perspective for personnel, detailing

how such damage to the organization can affect their own roles.

1.2 Intended Audience

This guidance is intended for any organization required to meet PCI DSS Requirement 12.6 to implement a

formal security awareness program within their organization. The guidance is applicable to organizations of all

sizes, budgets, and industries.

1.3 Terminology

Data Loss Prevention (DLP) Scanning: A process of monitoring and preventing sensitive data from leaving

a company environment.

Phishing: A form of social engineering where an attempt to acquire sensitive information (for example,

passwords, usernames, payment card details) from an individual through e-mail, chat, or other means. The

perpetrator often pretends to be someone trustworthy or known to the individual.

Privileged Access: Users who generally have elevated rights or access above that of a general user.

Typically, privileged access is given to those users who need to perform administrative-level functions or

access sensitive data, which may include access to cardholder data (CHD). Privileged Access may

encompass physical and/or logical access.

Social Engineering: As defined by (ISC)
2
: An attack based on deceiving users or administrators at the target

site—for example, a person who illegally enters computer systems by persuading an authorized person to

reveal IDs, passwords, and other confidential information.

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

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Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

2 Best Practices in Organizational Security Awareness

Security awareness should be conducted as an on-going program to ensure that training and knowledge is

not just delivered as an annual activity, rather it is used to maintain a high level of security awareness on a

daily basis.

Protecting cardholder data (CHD) should form part of any organization-wide information security awareness

program. Ensuring staff is aware of the importance of cardholder data security is important to the success of a

security awareness program and will assist in meeting PCI DSS Requirement 12.6.

2.1 Assemble the Security Awareness Team

The first step in the development of a formal security awareness program is assembling a security awareness

team. This team is responsible for the development, delivery, and maintenance of the security awareness

program. It is recommended the team be staffed with personnel from different areas of the organization, with

differing responsibilities representing a cross-section of the organization. Having a team in place will help

ensure the success of the security awareness program through assignment of responsibility for the program.

The size and membership of the security awareness team will depend on the specific needs of each

organization and its culture.

2.2 Determine Roles for Security Awareness

Role-based security awareness provides organizations a reference for training personnel at the appropriate

levels based on their job functions. The training can be expanded upon—and subject areas combined or

removed—according to the levels of responsibility and roles defined in the organization. The goal is to build a

reference catalogue of various types and depths of training to help organizations deliver the right training to

the right people at the right time. Doing so will improve an organization’s security as well as help maintain PCI

DSS compliance. Whether the focus is a singular, holistic, or a tiered approach, the content can be scoped to

meet an organization’s requirements.

All types of roles may not apply to all organizations, and some roles may need to be divided into subsections

to align with responsibilities. This can be modified according to the requirements of the organization.

2.2.1 Identify levels of responsibility

The first task when scoping a role-based security awareness program is to group individuals according

to their roles (job functions) within the organization. A simplified concept of this is shown in Figure 1 on

the following page.

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

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Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

Figure 1: Security Awareness Roles for Organizations

The diagram above identifies three types of roles, All Personnel, Specialized Roles, and

Management. A solid awareness program will help All Personnel recognize threats, see security as

beneficial enough to make it a habit at work and at home, and feel comfortable reporting potential

security issues. This group of users should be aware of the sensitivity of payment card data even if their

day-to-day responsibilities do not involve working with payment card data.

Additional training for those in Specialized Roles should focus on the individual’s obligation to follow

secure procedures for handling sensitive information and recognize the associated risks if privileged

access is misused. Examples of users in this category may include those processing payment cards,

writing applications that process payment cards, building databases to hold CHD, or designing and

building networks that CHD traverses. Each of these specialized roles requires additional training and

awareness to build and maintain a secure environment. Additionally, specific training may be required to

include understanding of PCI DSS and PA-DSS requirements.

Management has additional training needs that may differ from the two previous areas. Management

needs to understand the organization’s security policy and security requirements enough to discuss and

positively reinforce the message to staff, encourage staff awareness, and recognize and address

security related issues should they occur. The security awareness level of management may also need

to include an overall understanding of how the different areas fit together. Accordingly, managers of staff

with privileged access should have a solid understanding of the security requirements of their staff,

especially those with access to sensitive data. Management training will also help with decisions for

protecting the organization’s information.

2.2.2 Establish Minimum Security Awareness

Establishing a minimum awareness level for all personnel can be the base of the security awareness

program. Security awareness may be delivered in many ways, including formal training, computer-based

training, e-mails and circulars, memos, notices, bulletins, posters, etc. The security awareness program

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

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Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

should be delivered in a way that fits the overall culture of the organization and has the most impact to

personnel.

The following diagram depicts how the depth of awareness training should increase as the level of risk

associated with different roles.

Figure 2: Depth of Security Awareness Training

2.2.3 Determine the content of training and applicability based on PCI DSS

Training content can be broken down further to map to applicable PCI DSS requirements. Appendix A

contains a chart listing the high-level requirements of PCI DSS, with examples of roles listed that may

need security awareness training in these control areas. Section 3, Security Awareness Training

Content, contains further information related to training content for the different levels within an

organization.

2.3 Security Awareness throughout the Organization

The key to an effective security awareness program is in targeting the delivery of relevant material to the

appropriate audience in a timely and efficient manner. To be effective, the communication channel should

also fit the organization’s culture. By disseminating security awareness training via multiple communication

channels, the organization ensures that personnel are exposed to the same information multiple times in

different ways. This greatly improves how people remember the information presented to them. Content may

need to be adapted depending on the communication channel—for example, the content in an electronic

bulletin may be different than content in an instructor-led training seminar, even though both have the same

underlying message. The communication channel used should match the audience receiving the training

content and the type of content, as well as the content itself.

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

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Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

Electronic communication methods can include e-mail notifications, eLearning, internal social media, etc. It is

important to target electronic security awareness notifications to the appropriate audience to ensure the

information is read and understood. It is easier for electronic notifications to go unread or ignored by busy

personnel. By targeting the material and communication channel to relevant personnel, the security

awareness team can improve adoption of the security awareness program.

Non-electronic notifications may include posters, internal mailers, newsletters, and instructor-led training

events. In-person security awareness events that involve active participation by personnel can be extremely

effective. Audience size in an instructor-led presentation is important: the larger the group, the greater risk

that content may not be communicated effectively, as individuals may lose focus on the material presented if

they do not feel engaged. Including activities that engage the audience, such as scenario-based activities,

helps ensure the concepts are understood and remembered. For example, a structured social-engineering

exercise will teach personnel quickly how to identify a social-engineering attack and react appropriately.

Internal seminars, training provided during lunch breaks (commonly called “lunch-and-learns” or “brown bag”),

and employee social events are also great opportunities for the security awareness team to interact with

personnel and introduce security concepts. Appendix B provides a list of the common methods to

communicate security awareness throughout the organization.

It is recommended that communication of security awareness be included in new-hire processes, as well as

role changes for existing personnel. Security awareness training may be combined with other organizational

requirements, such as confidentiality and ethics agreements. Each job position in the organization should be

identified based on level of data access required. See Section 2.2, Determine Roles for Security Awareness,

for more information. To ensure that the security awareness team is notified whenever a role identified as

needing security awareness is filled, it is recommended this step be included in the process for all new-

hire/re-classifications. Inclusion in the new-hire/re-classification process ensures the overall training goals are

promoted without reliance on individual organizational units.

Management leadership and support for the security awareness program is crucial to its successful adoption

by staff. Managers are encouraged to:

 Actively encourage personnel to participate and uphold the security awareness principles.

 Model the appropriate security awareness approach to reinforce the learning obtained from the

program.

 Include security awareness metrics into management and staff performance reviews.

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

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Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

3 Security Awareness Training Content

As discussed in Section 2.2, Determining Roles of Security Awareness, it is recommended training content be

determined based on the role and the organization’s culture. The security awareness team may wish to

coordinate with the appropriate organizational units to classify each role in order to determine the level of

security awareness training required for those specific job duties. This is vital in development of content, as it

is just as easy to “over-train” an employee as it is to “under-train” an employee. In both cases, if information is

not properly absorbed, it could lead to unnecessary organizational risk. Regardless of role, it is recommended

that all staff receive basic security awareness training, developed in accordance with organizational policy. In

addition to general security awareness training, it is recommended personnel be exposed to general concepts

of cardholder data security, to promote proper data handling throughout the organization, according to their

role in the organization.

Training materials should be available for all areas of the organization. Security awareness and training

materials may be developed in-house, adapted from a professional organization’s work, or purchased from a

vendor. There are security awareness vendors that provide prepared materials such as computer-based

training (CBT), posters, and newsletters. For example, PCI SSC and other eLearning vendors offer training on

topics such as understanding PCI DSS, secure password practices, avoiding social engineering, avoiding

malicious downloads, etc.

The following are examples of reference materials that may help in the development of a Security Awareness

Program:

 National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Special Publication 800-50, Building an

Information Technology Security Awareness and Training Program, www.nist.gov

 International Standards Organization (ISO) 27002:2013, Information technology — Security techniques

— Code of practice for information security controls, www.iso.org

 International Standards Organization (ISO) 27001:2013, Information technology — Security techniques

— Information security management systems, www.iso.org

 COBIT 5 Appendix F.2, Detailed Guidance: Services, Infrastructure and Applications Enabler, Security

Awareness, www.isaca.org/cobit

Additionally, due to the increased focus on cyber security awareness, many government agencies and

industry bodies provide training materials to the public at no cost.

Choosing which materials to use in a security awareness training program is highly dependent on the

organization. Each organization should consider the time, resources, and culture when selecting the materials

to use for the security awareness training. Please see “Training Materials” in Appendix A for more

information and examples. All best practices listed here may be included in an organization’s security

awareness program; however, the best practices are not a requirement.

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

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Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

3.1 All Personnel

It is recommended that general security training for all personnel include defining what constitutes cardholder

data (CHD) and sensitive authentication data (SAD) and the organization’s responsibility to safeguard both. A

high level overview of the importance of the PCI DSS may also be included; to ensure personnel fully

understands the purpose behind an organizational policy to safeguard cardholder data. To ensure all

personnel are engaged stakeholders in the security awareness program, the roles and responsibilities of all

staff to protect CHD and SAD should be outlined during all security awareness training, in accordance with

organizational policy.

Because data is at risk both in electronic form and in non-electronic (paper) form, it is recommended that the

different ways to safeguard information for different media be covered at a basic level for all personnel. For

instance, considerations for protecting data in electronic format may include secure storage, transmission and

disposal. Considerations for paper-based formats may also include secure storage and disposal as well as a

“clear desk” policy. Without an understanding of how different media types need to be protected, personnel

may inadvertently handle data in an insecure manner.

Another important consideration for inclusion in general security training is awareness of social engineering

attacks. One way an attacker may use social engineering is to acquire a user’s credentials and work their way

through the organization from a low-security area to a high security area. Tailoring this awareness to reflect

the types of attacks that the organization may encounter provides the most effective results. Users should be

aware of the common methods by which fraudsters, hackers or other malicious individuals might try to obtain

credentials, payment card data, and other sensitive data, to minimize the risk of personnel unintentionally

disseminating sensitive information to outsiders. Training in organizational policies and procedures that

specify proper data handling, including sharing and transmission of sensitive data, is also recommended.

The training program should require personnel to acknowledge they have received and understand the

content being delivered. This is crucial to the success of the security awareness program. If content is being

delivered and not understood, the employee may still inadvertently put the organization’s information at risk.

Feedback on training content and comprehension are key to ensuring personnel understand the content and

the organization’s security policies.

Below is an example of content that is commonly included in general security awareness training:

 Organization’s Security awareness policy

 Impact of unauthorized access (for example: to systems or facilities)

 Awareness of CHD security requirements for different payment environments

 Card present environments

 Card-not-present environments

 Phone (individual or call center)

 Mail

 Fax

 Online (eCommerce)

 Where to get further information on protecting CHD in the organization (for example, security officer,

management, etc.)

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

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Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

 Importance of strong passwords and password controls

 Secure e-mail practices

 Secure practices for working remotely

 Avoiding malicious software – viruses, spyware, adware, etc.

 Secure browsing practices

 Mobile device security including BYOD

 Secure use of social media

 How to report a potential security incident and who to report it to (see PCI DSS Requirement 12.10)

 Protecting against social engineering attacks

 In Person – Physical Access

 Phone – Caller ID Spoofing

 E-mail – Phishing, Spear Phishing – E-mail Address Spoofing

 Instant Messaging

 Physical security

 Shoulder Surfing

 Dumpster Diving

NOTE: General security awareness training should be implemented even for organizations that outsource all

payment acceptance and processing, to ensure personnel are aware that sensitive information, including

CHD, must be protected.

3.2 Management

In addition to content for all personnel, management training should include more detailed information

regarding the consequences of a breach to management stakeholders. Management should understand not

only the monetary penalties of failing to safeguard CHD, but also the lasting harm to the organization due to

reputational (brand) damage. This factor is often overlooked when organizations outsource payment

processing, but is critically important.

As previously discussed, management will need to understand security requirements enough to discuss and

reinforce them, and encourage personnel to follow the requirements. It is recommended that management

security awareness training include specific content relevant to the area of responsibility, particularly areas

with access to sensitive data.

Management that is security-aware better understands the risk factors to the organization’s information. This

knowledge helps them make well-informed decisions related to business operations. Managers who are

security-aware can also assist with development of data security policies, secure procedures, and security

awareness training.

3.3 Specialized Roles

The categories listed below are examples of some common roles and the training content that may be

suitable for those users. Each organization’s specialized roles may differ, and the type of training for each role

will need to be carefully considered.

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

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Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

3.3.1 Cashier/Accounting Staff

When developing cashier/accounting staff security awareness training, it’s important to remember that

personnel in these roles are often the “first line of defense” as they are interacting directly with the

customers and those customer’s payment cards. Training for cashiers may include how to inspect point-

of-sale (POS) devices for tampering at the beginning of each shift, and being on the lookout for

suspicious behavior in areas where the public has access to payment terminals. PCI DSS Requirement

9.9.3 has additional information on training for the protection of payment-acceptance devices, such as

verifying the identity of third-party persons claiming to be repair or vendor personnel and verifying

requests to replace and return payment terminals.

3.3.2 Procurement Team

If an organization shares CHD or outsources a function that can impact the security of the cardholder

data environment (CDE), certain requirements to ensure continued protection of the CHD and the CDE

should be understood.

It is important that the personnel involved in the third-party procurement process understand how the

security of the information shared with third parties can be impacted and the role the third parties play in

the security awareness program. PCI DSS Requirement 12.8 outlines the steps for managing service

provider relationships. The PCI DSS Third-Party Security Assurance Information Supplement provides

further guidance for engaging with and maintaining relationships with third party service providers.

3.3.3 IT Administrators and Developers

System, Database, and Network Administrators and other staff with privileged access to computer

systems that may store, process, or transmit CHD will require more detailed security awareness training

that includes understanding the importance of secure system configurations for the protection of

sensitive information.

While general security awareness training (as described in Section 3.1) forms the basis for the security

awareness program for these job roles, additional training may be necessary to address the different

methods by which the role handles CHD. It may also be appropriate for these roles to have a general

understanding of the how the organization receives and processes payments.

For specialized roles, such as those who support systems and networks, vendor-provided

recommendations and industry best-practice guides for secure configurations can be useful content to

include in training. For example, the Centre for Internet Security (CIS) provides security benchmarks and

recommended configurations for a variety of systems.

Application developers, system developers, and testing staff have access to underlying code base,

which is critical to environment security. These users should be aware of their responsibilities to follow

the organization’s security policy, secure coding practices, and change control procedures as outlined in

PCI DSS Requirement 6, and be aware of current information on security threats and effective

countermeasures.

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

11

Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

3.4 Define Metrics to Assess Awareness Training

Metrics can be an effective tool to measure the success of a security awareness program, and can also

provide valuable information to keep the security awareness program up-to-date and effective. The particular

metrics used to measure the success of a security awareness program will vary for each organization based

on considerations such as size, industry, and type of training. The table below displays some metrics of a

successful security awareness program and can be used as a starting point for developing metrics.

Metric Training Effectiveness Indicator

Operational Metrics

Reduced system downtime and network or

application outages

Consistent, approved change-management

processes; fewer malware outbreaks; better controls

Reduction in malware outbreaks and PC

performance issues related to malware

Fewer opened malicious e-mails; increased reports

from personnel of malicious e-mails

Increase in reports of attempted e-mail or phone

scams

Better recognition by personnel of phishing and

other social-engineering attempts

Increase in reporting of security concerns and

unusual access

Increased understanding by personnel of risks

Increase in the number of queries from personnel

on how to implement secure procedures

Better awareness by personnel of potential threats

DLP scanning and network traces are active but not

detecting cardholder data outside the CDE

Better understanding by personnel of potential

threats

Vulnerability scans are active and detect high or

critical vulnerabilities

Decrease in time between detection and

remediation

Vulnerabilities are addressed or mitigated in a timely

manner

Better understanding by personnel of potential

threats and risks to sensitive information

Training Program Metrics

Increase in number personnel completing training Attendance tracking and performance evaluations

Increase in number of employees with privileged

access who have received required training

Attendance tracking and performance evaluations

Increase in personnel comprehension of training

material

Feedback from personnel; quizzes and training

assessments

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

12

Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

4 Security Awareness Program Checklist

Having a checklist may help organizations plan and manage their security awareness training program. The

information listed below may be used to assist with security awareness training and education planning.

Inclusion and use of this information is not a requirement.

Creating the Security Awareness Program

 Identify compliance or audit standards that your organization must adhere to.

 Identify security awareness requirements for those standards.

 Identify organizational goals, risks, and security policy.

 Identify stakeholders and get their support.

 Create a baseline of the organization’s security awareness.

 Create project charter to establish scope for the security awareness training program.

 Create steering committee to assist in planning, executing and maintaining the awareness program.

 Identify who you will be targeting—different roles may require different/additional training (employees,

IT personnel, developers, senior leadership).

 Identify what you will communicate to the different groups (goal is shortest training possible that has the

greatest impact).

 Identify how you will communicate the content—three categories of training: new, annual, and ongoing.

Implementing Security Awareness

 Develop and/or purchase training materials and content to meet requirements identified during program

creation.

 Document how and when you intend to measure the success of the program.

 Identify who to communicate results to, when, and how.

 Deploy security awareness training utilizing different communication methods identified during program

creation.

 Implement tracking mechanisms to record who completes the training and when.

Sustaining Security Awareness

 Identify when to review your security awareness program each year.

 Identify new or changing threats or compliance standards and updates needed; include in annual

update.

 Conduct periodic assessments of organization security awareness and compare to baseline.

 Survey staff for feedback (usefulness, effectiveness, ease of understanding, ease of implementation,

recommended changes, accessibility).

 Maintain management commitment to supporting, endorsing and promoting the program.

Documenting the Security Awareness Program

 Document security awareness program including all previously listed steps within “Creating the Security

Awareness Program,” “Implementing Security Awareness,” and “Sustaining Security Awareness.”

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

13

Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

Appendix A: Sample Mapping of PCI DSS Requirements to
Different Roles, Materials, and Metrics

The table in this appendix provides a sample format for organizations wishing to document how PCI DSS

requirements could be incorporated into their training program frameworks. For each PCI DSS requirement,

the table identifies potential roles that may be subject to training, sources for training materials, and metrics to

measure the effectiveness of training in those control areas.

Roles and responsibilities are different for each organization, and any mapping of PCI DSS requirements to

roles, training materials, and metrics will therefore vary from one organization to the next. The information in

this Appendix is intended as an example and may be useful as a starting point for determining how PCI DSS

requirements could apply to training for different roles within the organization, the materials that could be used

for training in those areas, and how to measure results of the training.

The columns listed in the table are:

PCI DSS Requirements: This column contains both the requirement number and the description of the PCI

DSS Requirement. There are both high-level and specific requirements included to better convey the

applicability of requirements to specific roles within the organization.

Target Audience for Training: The audiences included in these columns are examples of roles within an

organization that may need security awareness training. This column may be used to identify which roles

need training related to the different PCI DSS Requirements. Please note that all personnel should receive

the general security awareness training in addition to any training specific to the role and PCI DSS control

area(s).

Source Content for Training Material: This column may be used to identify appropriate material for security

awareness training on the specific PCI DSS control.

Metrics: This column contains examples of metrics that may be used to measure the success of the security

awareness training in the specific PCI DSS control area.

Note: This appendix is intended as guidance only and is for optional use at the discretion of the organization;

completion of this appendix is not a requirement. The use of this checklist ultimately will depend on the

specific type of training chosen by the organization.

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

14

Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

PCI DSS Requirement
Target audience for training

1
Source Content for Training

Materials
Metrics

All M C/A PT IT

Build and Maintain a Secure Network and Systems

1.x Install and maintain a firewall

configuration to protect

cardholder data.

x  Industry standards and best
practices for network and systems

security—e.g., NIST, ISO, CIS,

HIPAA.

 Vendor reference materials and

best practice documentation

 Organization firewall change and

approval policy, personal firewall

policy, system standard build

policy.

 Few if any network outages.

 Changes implemented successfully

with minimal disruption.

 Reductions in standard build

deviations.

1.4 Install personal firewall

software on any mobile

and/or employee-owned

devices that connect to the

Internet when outside the

network—e.g., laptops used

by employees—and which

are also used to access the

network.

x

2.x Do not use vendor-supplied

defaults for system

passwords and other security

parameters.

x

1
A = All; M = Management; C/A = Cashiers/Accounting; PT = Procurement Team; IT = IT Admin & Developers

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

15

Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

PCI DSS Requirement
Target audience for training

1
Source Content for Training

Materials
Metrics

All M C/A PT IT

Protect Cardholder Data
1

3.x Protect stored cardholder

data.
x x  Industry standards or regulations

related to the protection of

consumers private information—

e.g., Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act

(GLBA) for protection of

consumer’s private information,

Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) for

protection of sensitive data related

to financial reporting.

 Vendor reference materials and

best-practice documentation

 Organization data retention and

disposal policy, encryption key

management policy, secure e-mail

policy.

 DLP scanning and network traces

do not detect PCI data.

3.7 Ensure that security policies

and operational procedures

for protecting stored

cardholder data are

documented, in use, and

known to all affected parties.

x

4.x Encrypt transmission of

cardholder data across open,

public networks

x

4.2 Never send unprotected

PANs by end-user

messaging technologies—for

example, e-mail, instant

messaging, chat, etc.

x

1
A = All; M = Management; C/A = Cashiers/Accounting; PT = Procurement Team; IT = IT Admin & Developers

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

16

Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

PCI DSS Requirement
Target audience for training

1
Source Content for Training

Materials
Metrics

All M C/A PT IT

Maintain a Vulnerability Management Program
1

5.x Protect all systems against

malware and regularly

update anti-virus software or

programs

x

x

 Vendor reference materials for anti-

virus or anti-malware software.

 Organization anti-virus/malware

policy, vulnerability management

policy, secure coding methodology,

change control policy.

 PCI DSS, OWASP Top 10,

CWE/SANS TOP 25 Most

Dangerous Software Errors, NIST,

COBIT 5 Appendix F, CIS Security

Benchmarks.

 Solid, consistent counts of malware

being detected, cleaned,

quarantined over time.

 Reduction in PC performance

issues caused by malware.

 Few or no internally spread

infections to multiple systems.

6.x Develop and maintain secure

systems and applications
x

x

 Few if any system or application

outages.

 Updates and changes implemented

successfully with minimal

disruption.

 Monthly reports show consistent,

appropriate patching.

 Reduction in build deviations.

 Regular vulnerability scans show

no high or critical vulnerabilities.

6.4 Follow change control

processes and procedures

for all changes to system

components.

x

1
A = All; M = Management; C/A = Cashiers/Accounting; PT = Procurement Team; IT = IT Admin & Developers

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

17

Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

PCI DSS Requirement
Target audience for training

1
Source Content for Training

Materials
Metrics

All M C/A PT IT

Implement Strong Access Control Measures
1

7.x Restrict access to cardholder

data by business need to

know

x

x

 Vendor reference materials on

implementing detailed access

controls within

authentication/authorization

environments.

 Organization access control policy

including information on how

business need to know is

determined and approved for

different roles.

 No alerts of unusual access.

 Regular access reviews show few

required changes.

8.x Identify and authenticate

access to system

components

x

x

 Vendor reference materials on two-

factor authentication, password

management,

session controls, and

implementing detailed access

controls.

 Organization access control policy,

password policy, information

security policy.

 Reviews of audit logs for failed

access attempts show no

inconsistencies.

9.x Restrict physical access to

cardholder data

x x  Physical security policy
requirements.

 General user awareness.

 Organization visitor access policy,

secure device-handling procedures,

data retention and disposal policy.

 Monitoring show minimal

inconsistent behavior.

 Surveys of employee

understandings of secured areas

return high awareness quotient.

 Reporting of unusual access or

behaviors increases.

9.9 Protect devices that capture

payment card data via direct

physical interaction with the

card from tampering and

substitution.

x

1
A = All; M = Management; C/A = Cashiers/Accounting; PT = Procurement Team; IT = IT Admin & Developers

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

18

Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

PCI DSS Requirement
Target audience for training

1
Source Content for Training

Materials
Metrics

All M C/A PT IT

Regularly Monitor and Test Networks
1

10.x Track and monitor all access

to network resources and

cardholder data

x

x  Industry standards or regulations
related to access to sensitive

data—e.g., NIST, ISO, GLBA,

SOX.

 Vendor reference materials and

best-practice documentation.

 Organization log-review

procedures, change control policy,

vulnerability-testing policy,

penetration-testing methodology.

 Common vulnerabilities found in

the National Vulnerability

Database, SANS CWE Top 25, etc.

 Reduced network, system,

application outages.

 Updates and changes implemented

successfully with minimal

disruption.

 Monthly reports show consistent,

appropriate patching.

 Regular vulnerability scans show

no high or critical vulnerabilities.

 Vulnerabilities discovered are

addressed in a timely manner or

mitigated appropriately.

11.x Regularly test security

systems and processes

x

1
A = All; M = Management; C/A = Cashiers/Accounting; PT = Procurement Team; IT = IT Admin & Developers

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

19

Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

PCI DSS Requirement
Target audience for training

1
Source Content for Training

Materials
Metrics

All M C/A PT IT

Maintain an Information Security Policy
1

12.x Maintain a policy that

addresses information security

for all personnel

x x  Industry standards or regulations
related to background checks,

privacy, and information security

policies—e.g., FFIEC, SOX,

HIPAA, NIST, ISO.

 Organization information security

policy, risk assessment process,

third-party service provider

management and monitoring policy,

and incident response plan

 Malware infections reduced over

time.

 Increase in reporting of phishing

attempts.

 Increase in reporting of security

concerns.

12.2 Implement a risk-assessment

process
x

12.6 Implement a formal security

awareness program to make

all personnel aware of the

importance of cardholder data

security.

x

12.8 Maintain and implement

policies and procedures to

manage service providers with

whom cardholder data is

shared, or that could affect the

security of cardholder data

x x

PCI DSS Appendix A: Additional PCI DSS Requirements for Shared Hosting Providers

Shared hosting providers must

protect the cardholder data

environment

x x  Shared hosting provider policies
and procedures for securing hosted

environments

1
A = All; M = Management; C/A = Cashiers/Accounting; PT = Procurement Team; IT = IT Admin & Developers

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

20

Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

Appendix B: Security Awareness Program Record

The sample table below provides a method for an organization to record how it is managing a security awareness program. The table includes

the following columns:

 Activity: This column contains some of the key tasks that could be performed when implementing a security awareness program.

Examples of how an organization may choose to implement each activity are also provided, such as types of training content, delivery

methods, tracking and recording options, employee acknowledgements, and so on. The particular activities in this column will vary for

each organization according to their individual program.

 Implementation Details: This column may contain details of how different elements of the program are implemented; for example,

details of purchased training products or vendors, assignment of responsibilities for managing different delivery channels, roles those

different training methods will apply to, and so on.

 Frequency: This column may be used to track the frequency that each training or activity is expected to occur—for example, upon hire

or upon role change, annually, bi-annually, etc.

 PCI DSS Reference: This column may be used to map the information contained in the first three columns to particular PCI DSS

requirements and/or testing procedures, which an organization may find useful when documenting its PCI DSS compliance during a

self-assessment or completion of a ROC.

Note: This appendix is intended as guidance only and is for optional use at the discretion of the organization; completion of this

appendix is not a requirement. The use of this checklist ultimately will depend on the specific type of training chosen by the

organization.

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

21

Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

Sample Activity Implementation Notes Frequency PCI DSS Reference

Identify methods for creating security awareness materials:

Testing Procedure 12.6.1.a

Classroom training

 Consider third-party on-site training.

 Security Awareness Training team conducts training.

Computer-based training

 Also consider having a third party who has PCI experience

train personnel.

 Websites for training information—e.g.,

www.pcisecuritystandards.org.

Poster campaigns

 Display posters in break rooms and other employee areas.

Newsletters

 Provide employee newsletters highlighting PCI DSS security as

it applies to the employees.

E-mail communications

 E-mails can be used to remind employees about security

requirements responsibility.

Screensavers

 Screensavers can be used to remind employees to log off

computers when away from their workstations and other useful

security information.

Security meetings / roundtables / lunch-and-learn sessions

 Have lunch-and-learns to discuss card data security and allow

employees to ask questions.

Information Security Team branding

 Elect a security team to arrange trainings and other functions

as it relates to security awareness.

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

22

Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

Sample Activity Implementation Notes Frequency PCI DSS Reference

Information Security promotions

 Give personnel small prizes for answering questions correctly.

Arrange ad-hoc security awareness events.

Information Security Intranet

 Display security messages on organizational intranet to remind

personnel of the importance of cardholder data security.

Identify methods for delivering security awareness training upon hire and annually: Testing Procedure 12.6.1.b

Computer-based training

 Also consider having a third party who has PCI experience

train personnel.

 Websites for training information:

o www.pcisecuritystandards.org

o www.mastercard.us/merchants/support/rules.html

o usa.visa.com/merchants/protect-your-business/index.jsp

HR onboarding (instructor-led training)

HR onboarding (policy review and sign-off)

Information Security Team presentations

Identify methods for recording attendance on training: Testing Procedure 12.6.1.b

Meeting agendas with attendees

 Prepare an agenda for security items to be discussed with

employees.

Signed attendance sheets

 Require signed acknowledgements that the employee

understands and has completed security awareness training.

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

23

Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

Sample Activity Implementation Notes Frequency PCI DSS Reference

HR onboarding checklists

 Records of new hires requiring security awareness training.

Computer-based training records

 Ensure tracking and recording of who takes the training and

whether it was completed successfully.

Identify methods for ensuring all employees attend training: Testing Procedure 12.6.1.b

HR monitoring of attendance and/or checklists

Employee performance reviews

 Making security awareness part of the review process for

personnel who have access to cardholder data helps ensure

personnel attend training.

Computer-based training completion reports

 Ability to pull reports from computer based training that shows

who took the training, date taken, pass or fail.

Identify methods for employees to acknowledge they have read/understood the

information security policy at least annually:
Testing Procedure 12.6.2

E-mail acknowledgements

 Employee e-mail acknowledgement of completion and

understanding of the information security policy as proof of

annual reviews.

Signed policies

 Obtain signed employee acknowledgement of reading of the

security policy as proof of the annual requirement.

Electronic signatures in computer-based training

 Ability to electronically sign an acknowledgement that

computer-based training has been completed.

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

24

Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

Acknowledgements

PCI SSC would like to acknowledge the contribution of the Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness

Program Special Interest Group (SIG) in the preparation of this document. The Best Practices for Implementing a

Security Awareness Program SIG consists of representatives from the following organizations:

403 Labs, LLC

Air Products & Chemicals

Akamai Technologies

Allstate

American Express

American Family Insurance

Aon

Aperia Solutions

atsec (Beijing) Information

Technology Co., Ltd

Bally Total Fitness

Bank Of New Zealand

Bashas’ Inc.

BB&T Corporation

bet365

Board of Trustees of the

University of Arkansas

Bozzuto’s Inc

Bridge Point Communications

Pty Ltd

BrightLine CPAs & Associates,

Inc.

British Airways PLC

BT PLC

CBIZ Security & Advisory

Services, LLC

CDG Commerce

China Unionpay Co Ltd

Cisco

Citigroup Inc

Clydesdale Bank

Coalfire Systems, Inc.

Compass IT Compliance, LLC

Comsec

CradlePoint

Crosskey Banking Solutions

Crowe Horwath LLP

DataFlight Europe A/S

Deluxe Corporation

Diamond Resorts Corp.

Digital Defense, Inc.

Domino’s Pizza Inc.

DST Output

DSW Inc.

Elavon Merchant Services

Ergonomic Solutions

EVO Payments International

Experian Information Services

Exxon Mobil Corporation

Fiscal Systems, Inc.

FishNet Security

Foresight IT Consulting Pty Ltd

Fortrex

Games Workshop Ltd

Gap Inc.

Gemserv Limited

Global Payments Direct Inc.

GuidePoint Security, LLC

Hitachi-Omron Terminal

Solutions, Corp.

IBM Corporation

IQ Information Quality

Isis Mobile Commerce

Kiwibank Limited

KnowIT Secure AB

Lloyds Banking Group

MegaPath Inc

MobileIron, Inc.

Módulo Security Solutions S.A.

MTI Technology Ltd

Nettitude Ltd

Paciolan Inc.

Payment Software Company

(PSC)

PayPal Inc.

Pier 1 Imports

Post Office

Princeton Payment Solutions LLC

(dba CardConnect)

Progressive Casualty Insurance

Company

Promocion y Operacion SA de CV

(PROSA)

RBC Royal Bank

RBS

Secure Enterprise Computing

Secure Enterprise Computing

Secured Net Solutions Inc.

Security Risk Management

Sense of Security Pty Ltd

SISA

SIX Payment Services Ltd

Solutionary, Inc.

Starwood Hotels & Resorts

Worldwide, Inc.

State Farm Mutual Automobile

Insurance Company

Suncor Energy Inc.

Sword & Shield Enterprise

Security Inc.

Sysnet Global Solutions

Telstra

Tesco Stores Ltd

The Brick Group

The Walt Disney Company

Tieto Latvia SIA

Transport For London

Trustwave Holdings, Inc

TUI Travel Plc

U.S. Bancorp

U.S. Cellular

UL Transaction Security PTY Ltd.

UPS (United Parcel Service)

Vendorcom

Verizon/CyberTrust

VigiTrust Ltd

Visa Inc.

Vodat International Limited

Xpient Solutions LLC

ZZ Servers

The intent of this document is to provide supplemental information. Information provided here does
not replace or supersede requirements in any PCI SSC Standard.

25

Information Supplement • Best Practices for Implementing a Security Awareness Program • October 2014

About the PCI Security Standards Council

The PCI Security Standards Council is an open global forum that is responsible for the development,

management, education, and awareness of the PCI Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) and other standards

that increase payment data security. Created in 2006 by the founding payment card brands American

Express, Discover Services, JCB International, MasterCard and Visa Inc., the Council has more than 650

Participating Organizations representing merchants, banks, processors and vendors worldwide. To learn

more about playing a part in securing payment card data globally, please visit: pcisecuritystandards.org.