Psychology of violent relations class

Two different assignments

Instructions: Please use and apply material from the text and/or lecture when answering this question. Please aim for an answer that is 150-200 words. Please copy and paste your answer into the assignment submission area or attach a document. Looking over the characteristics of the victims and perpetrators of sexual abuse (p. 155-163) in your text, in what ways are the characteristics of the victim and perpetrator the same or different from those noted in the text?

Instructions: Please use and apply material from the text and/or lecture when answering this question. Please aim for an answer that is 150-200 words. Looking over the forms of neglect (p. 191-199), what types of neglect do you see present in this case? In what ways do you think the neglect this child suffered also overlaps with psychological maltreatment(p. 209)? Do you see potential evidence of psychological abuse?

Psychology of violent relations class Two different assignments Instructions: Please use and apply material from the text and/or lecture when answering this question. Please aim for an answer that is
quiz 3 Availability: Item is hidden from students. It was last available on Jun 26, 2022 11:59 PM. Attached Files:  homework 4 article.docx  (104.948 KB)  homework 4 article.htm  (15.516 KB) Instructions: Please use and apply material from the text and/or lecture when answering this question. Please aim for an answer that is 150-200 words. Please copy and paste your answer into the assignment submission area or attach a document. Looking over the characteristics of the victims and perpetrators of sexual abuse (p. 155-163) in your text, in what ways are the characteristics of the victim and perpetrator the same or different from those noted in the text? Sexual abuse teacher set freeAFP23 March 2006A TEACHER who admitted having sex with a 14-year-old student was freed yesterday after prosecutors in Florida dropped sexual abuse charges to avoid calling the boy to the stand. In the case, which drew national attention, Florida prosecutor Brad King said he withdrew the charges because forcing the victim to testify could further traumatize him. The attractive blonde, blue-eyed teacher, Debra LaFave, 25, had earlier admitted to having had sex with her student several times in 2004, including in a mobile classroom where she taught and twice inside a car driven by the victim’s older brother, who was only 15. The victim’s family voiced concerns that forcing him to testify amid intense media attention would be traumatizing. LaFave’s lawyers and prosecutors then reached a deal in which she would avoid jail while accepting a sentence of three years of partial house arrest and seven years of conditional release. But Judge Hale Stancil rejected the deal, saying it would allow a defendant to beat a conviction for the mere reason that the victim wanted to avoid testifying because of excessive media attention. “Accepting the proposed plea agreement would undermine the credibility of this court and the criminal justice system as a whole, and would erode public confidence in our schools,” he wrote in his ruling. But the prosecutor then decided to drop the case entirely to protect the boy. “The court may be willing to risk the well-being of the victims in this case in order to force it to trial. I am not,” Mr. King said. “Crime victims are not all alike; all have their own unique injury and their own unique vulnerabilities,” he said. The case became national news and turned LaFave into a celebrity, with pictures circulating on the internet of her in a bikini and a sexy dress astride a motorcycle. Early in the trial, her lawyer John Fitzgibbons tried to use her beauty, arguing she was too pretty to be imprisoned. “To place an attractive young woman in that kind of hell hole is like putting a piece of raw meat in with the lions,” he told the court. In a televised news conference after the charges were dropped, LaFave attributed her behavior to bipolar disorder, and attacked journalists for judgmental coverage. “I was very nervous. I have a lot of things in my past that unfortunately became very public,” she said. LaFave said she was taking medical treatment for her bipolar disorder, and meanwhile also planned to study journalism.     Quiz 4 Availability: Item is hidden from students. It was last available on Jul 3, 2022 11:59 PM. Attached Files:  homework 5 article.docx  (138.544 KB)  homework 5 article.htm  (25.9 KB) Quiz 5 Instructions: Please use and apply material from the text and/or lecture when answering this question. Please aim for an answer that is 150-200 words. Looking over the forms of neglect (p. 191-199), what types of neglect do you see present in this case? In what ways do you think the neglect this child suffered also overlaps with psychological maltreatment(p. 209)? Do you see potential evidence of psychological abuse? Records: Parents’ deception shrouded years of abuse BY JACK KRESNAKFREE PRESS STAFF WRITER March 10, 2006 Prosecutors: Lisa Holland misled people about Ricky’s welfare. (AL GOLDIS/Associated Press) JACKSON — Social workers who checked on Ricky Holland’s welfare every month for more than three years frequently praised his foster parents for doing a “wonderful job” with Ricky and his siblings, according to state records obtained by the Free Press. But those records, as well as interviews with former neighbors, provide signs that Tim and Lisa Holland may have lied about Ricky’s supposed violent behavior, and exaggerated his emotional problems to school officials and a child psychiatrist. Ingham County prosecutors are trying to prove that Lisa Holland frequently misled people about the children’s welfare while mentally and physically abusing Ricky for four years. An example of the Hollands’ alleged deceptions is found in their foster-care licensing file that was obtained by the Free Press under the state Freedom of Information Act. In February 2004, when a foster-care worker from the state Department of Human Services asked the Hollands about how they handled discipline, Ricky, who was in the interview, “started to cry.” Holland said they used time-outs and loss of privileges to discipline him. When asked why he reacted that way, his mother told the worker Ricky “had a hard day at school and was upset because he had been kicked off the bus that day,” the report said. But that was not true, according to testimony from the bus driver, Marcia Polly, at the preliminary exam last week: Ricky was never kicked off the school bus. In fact, Polly and her bus aide, Joan Thomas, testified that Ricky was a well-behaved child and that they refused Lisa Holland’s demand that they put him in a restraint harness because of his impulsive behavior. Polly and Thomas said they contacted Child Protective Services about what they described as Lisa Holland’s meanness toward Ricky, but the foster-care file does not reflect that. The Hollands are charged with murder and first-degree child abuse in the death of Ricky, a 7-year-old whose skeletal remains were found Jan. 27, six months after his parents reported he had run away from their Leroy Township home. The family’s foster-care licensing file, containing yearly reports by social workers who visited the Hollands every month, paints a generally positive picture of Tim and Lisa Holland’s care for Ricky and his three siblings, who now live with relatives under state supervision. But the documents and interviews with the Hollands’ former neighbors, show that Lisa Holland may have misrepresented Ricky’s psychological symptoms. On several occasions, Lisa Holland told Jackson public school officials, neighbors and Ricky’s psychiatrist that he was violent and impulsive, according to court testimony. But school officials and the boy’s court-assigned attorney, who met with Ricky frequently, say they never saw any evidence of that behavior. And the foster-care record shows no indication the Hollands made similar reports to social workers. The Hollands — who were paid more than $2,200 a month by the state to care for the four children — were not licensed to care for children with severe emotional disorders like those allegedly described by Lisa Holland. They were licensed only to care for children with mild problems. A preliminary examination for the Hollands, who police said blamed each other in Ricky’s death, is set to continue today in 55th District Court in Mason. Ingham County prosecutors want to prove that the couple abused Ricky by tormenting and starving him for more than four years in the Hollands’ two-story home on Pierce Street in Jackson and at the home near Williamston, where they moved in May 2005. Ricky was 3 in October 2000 when the department placed him with the Hollands after his biological mother said she wanted her son placed in foster care, according to Jackson County Family Court records. Ricky’s court-assigned attorney, James Treciak, met frequently with Ricky in his law office and said Thursday that he never suspected the boy was being abused in the Hollands’ home. Treciak represented Ricky and the boy’s three siblings during hearings in Jackson County Family Court for about three years until the children were adopted by the Hollands. “In my experience, the agency jumps all over foster parents when allegations are made,” Treciak said. “I had no inclination or suspicion that they were not in a safe foster-care placement and adoption placement.” Former neighbors in Jackson said they thought it strange that Lisa Holland, 33, kept her children inside and allowed babies to cry for hours on end without tending to them. But none of them ever called Child Protective Services. Julie Hewlett, who lives across the street from the Hollands’ former home, said she once asked Lisa Holland why Ricky didn’t play outside. “He’s not the kind that likes playing outside,” Lisa Holland said, according to Hewlett. “He’s the kind that wants to stay inside and watch TV.” Hewlett said Lisa Holland also told her, without prompting, about Ricky’s supposed mental and emotional problems — in front of the boy. Hewlett said Ricky looked embarrassed. Hewlett also said that twice last winter, she heard a baby crying for long stretches through an open second-story bedroom window at the Holland home. “It was pretty darn cold,” Hewlett said. “That window was open all the way and I kept thinking, why does she have that window open?” referring to Lisa Holland. Another neighbor, Kim DeVaughn, also said she heard a baby crying for hours at a time. “I hardly knew she had kids except for the baby crying at night,” DeVaughn said. The only times DeVaughn said she saw Lisa Holland was on two occasions when DeVaughn had garage sales and Lisa Holland came by to purchase baby clothes. They lived next door to each other. In April 2004, after school officials turned down Lisa Holland’s request to declare Ricky certified for special education services — something not reflected in the department records provided to the Free Press by the state — Lisa Holland removed him from the school and said she would homeschool him. Ricky, whose first-grade teacher said he begged not to be taken out of school, never returned to Cascades Elementary in Jackson. A year later, the family moved to Ingham County. Last November, four months after Ricky disappeared, the couple told DHS workers that they wanted to stop being foster parents, a final report from the department said. At that time, the police investigation was focusing increasingly on Tim and Lisa Holland. “Lisa stated that she and her husband are under a lot of stress … and that things are really hectic at this time,” the report said. “She indicated that she is doing her best to keep things together, but that this year has been very traumatic for the entire family.” Contact JACK KRESNAK at 313-223-4544 or [email protected]. Copyright © 2006 Detroit Free Press Inc.